Finish-funded project on climate change comes to a conclusion

After close to 7 years (5 years of research on the impacts of climate change and 2 years of dissemination of results) of a fruitful and exciting contribution to climate change adaptation in the highland ecosystems of Eastern Africa, the AFERIA project held its last project meeting in Addis Ababa the capital city of Ethiopia. Being the highest elevation capital city in Africa, and the fifth highest in the world, Addis Ababa offered the perfect venue, firmly situated on a well-watered plateau surrounded by hills and mountains, to end a project that has focused on the climate change impacts on food security and ecosystem resilience in the highlands and mountains of Eastern Africa.

 

Kilimanjaro Multi-stakeholder Forum

  The third Multi-stakeholder Forum under the AFERIA project was held recently in Moshi, Tanzania. The agenda of this forum was to communicate the key results of the scientific synthesis carried out under the project and further inform how these results will be useful in the design and implementation of climate-smart landscapes in Kilimanjaro.

Project findings for Jimma Area disseminated to stakeholders in Ethiopia

In line with the AFERIA project goal of disseminating recent findings on climate change adaptation, the agenda of the multi-stakeholder forum was to communicate the key results of the scientific synthesis carried out under the project with key beneficiaries in the Ethiopian government, academia and both local and international non-governmental organisations. In addition, this forum informed how the results will be useful in the design and implementation of climate-smart landscapes in the Jimma area.

Taita Hills Multi-stakeholder Forum,May 2017

The first Multi-stakeholder Forum under the AFERIA project was held recently in the Taita Hills. In line with the project goal of disseminating recent findings on climate change adaptation, the agenda of this forum was to communicate the key results of the scientific synthesis carried out under the project and further inform how these results will be useful in the design and implementation of climate-smart landscapes in Taita Hills. 

Capacity building for sustainability: Agriculture extension officers trained on IPM

Research findings from the CHIESA project indicate that due to the changing climate, increasing temperatures are projected to worsen the impacts of insect pests on staple and cash crops, such as stem borers on maize, coffee berry borers and coffee stem borers on coffee, diamondback moths on crucifers, and fruit flies on avocado and citrus which will adversely affect food security and livelihoods of small-scale farmers on the highlands and montane regions of eastern Africa. 

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